B-17 Flying Fortresses Over Germany in April 1945(USAF Photo)

Air Supremacy II: Re-learning Asymmetry

[This is a continuation of a previous article in a series] There are many ways of going forward, but only one way of standing still. Franklin D. Roosevelt The founding fathers of military aviation had an uphill battle in advocating the value of airpower to their doubtful Army and Navy counterparts. Though their approaches (and…

Three French Air Force Rafale Arrive in the Persian Gulf, January 2015(Photo by French Air Force)

What Kind of Airpower Does a Country like France Need?

This is the second part of a two-part article on French airpower in current contingencies. For a country like France, the strategic context in the short- to mid-term will probably be the continuation of the current era of protracted interventions, necessary but unfortunately non-decisive, in Africa (as leading nation) and the Middle East (as part…

China Shipping Line Merchant Vessel Xin Mei Zhou(Photo by Michael R Perry)

The Strategic Interdiction Trilogy

The Strategic Interdiction trilogy is the outcome of three years of intermittent study of logistic vulnerabilities of the People’s Republic of China. Current airpower strategy regarding China tends to revolve around a replay of the DESERT STORM air campaign, a technique manifestly unsuitable for use against a major power like China, to say nothing of…

1 r8HrthuPxuM2mgLN0yp4EA

Same Wars, Different Fights: The Army and Air Force Visions

This article was originally posted on The Strategy Bridge.  We are sharing it here due to its outstanding contribution to  airpower dialogue. The Army of 2025 and Beyond will effectively employ lethal and non-lethal overmatch against any adversary to prevent, shape, and win conflicts and achieve national interests. It will leverage cross-cultural and regional experts…

Royal Air Force MQ-9 Reaper(RAF Photo, Cpl S. Follows)

Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems: Humanity’s Best Hope?

The past decade has witnessed a revolution in the use of remotely operated systems by the UK’s Armed Forces.  Nowhere has this been more evident – or controversial – than in the air domain.  Debate over the nomenclature of such systems – known variously as Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs), Uninhabited Air Systems (UASs), Remotely Piloted…